Google Allo rolling out now, what it’s like to use it?

After the long wait Google is rolling out its new messaging platform to Android and iOS devices worldwide. It was announced during the Google I/O 2016. It is AI based Messaging app which we can make replies by hearing voices, have inbuilt Google Assistant and much more. It supports emoji, stickers and a new Whisper Shout feature.

The features Google Allo includes are listed below.

  • Allo has Smart Reply built -so you can respond to messages without typing a single word.
  • Express yourself with photos, emojis and stickers
  • Allo also features the Google assistant –  richness of Google directly into your chats
  • Privacy and security – Chat in Incognito Mode

Earlier Google made this app available for registration. Now it is available for Download for all the users worldwide on both the Android and iOS . Moreover, Google is also going to announce its Pixel and Pixel XL Android phone on Oct 4th.

Recommended : How does Allo’s SMS support work?

gbot-foodAllo includes a few capabilities that make using it feel notably different than sending texts through your phone’s default SMS service. For one, it includes the company’s new Google Assistant, which surfaces answers to questions and makes suggestions directly within your chat window. Allo can intelligently suggest responses to text and photo messages through a feature called Smart Reply. As other messangers like LINE and Facebook Messenger, Google’s new messaging app offers an array of stickers to choose from. Google initially unveiled Allo during its developer conference in May; today it launches for iPhone and Android users.

The Google Assistant can be summoned within a conversation by typing the tag “@google” before entering text. Typing something like, “@google Where should I go for brunch?,” when texting a friend could prompt Google to pull up a list of restaurants near you. This saves some time since you don’t have to leave your chat thread, open another app like Yelp to find a restaurant, and then return to your messaging app. This generally works very well when you’re looking up restaurants and movie times. Google will even in some cases ask what your preferences are so it can offer better suggestions in the future. For example, when I asked the Google Assistant what I should eat, it asked what types of cuisine I like. But I found that if I needed something really specific, like a bus schedule, I was better off using another app or looking it up through a browser like Chrome or Safari.

In addition to calling up Google Assistant in chats, you can also just chat with it one-on-one. This is essentially a way to interact with Google in a conversational way reminiscent of Ask Jeeves rather than typing out rigid search queries. What’s nice about using Google Assistant in Allo is that it’s not just a search engine packaged in a different way. You can ask what’s next on your calendar, convert pounds to ounces, and search for the answer to a question all in one place. The company also had some fun with Google Assistant and trained it to play a few games, such as one in which it uses a string of emoji characters to get you to guess a movie title. It’s surprisingly addictive.

Also read : Google Allo sounds exciting, but it might not be that great

Google sees this Assistant as being the next major evolution of its search product.Allo and the company’s upcoming Google Home smart speaker will be the first two products to include the new technology. (For now, Allo is a separate product from Google’s other messenger Hangouts.)

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Google’s chat app also proactively suggests responses for you when you receive new messages and images. If your sibling sends you a photo of the family dog, for instance, Allo might suggest “How cute!” or “Adorable” as a response. If someone sends a message as simple as “Lol,” Allo could offer the option to send a text bubble that says “How’s your day going?” or something similar. It’s a handy feature for instances in which you might not have a ton of time to type out a full response, and Google says Allo will learn more about your responses over time to adapt to your style. Allo also has an incognito mode similar to Chrome that encrypts all chats and automatically deletes messages after a certain amount of time.

Expression is another core focus for Google’s Allo: the new messenger includes the ability to download sticker packs, make text larger or smaller for emphasis, and annotate photos. Adjusting the size of the text is as easy as sliding your thumb up and down over the send button.

Given the attention Google paid to customization, the fact that you can’t add a custom background or send full screen animations with messages like you can with Apple’s iMessage feels like an oversight. But Google hasn’t ruled out adding more personalization options in the future.

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8 thoughts on “Google Allo rolling out now, what it’s like to use it?

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