Samsung went against industry standard and Self-tested the Galaxy Note 7 battery

The Samsung Galaxy Note 7 might be dead but its battery crisis will live as a bad memory for years to come. Just one component, that forced Samsung to ditch an entire flagship production and sales. A component that used to be removable by the way. The company is still trying to find out the cause of its $5.3 billion misery.  Usually, even companies like Apple, and everyone else, use third-party labs certified by U.S. wireless industry’s trade group. But according to the Wall Street Journal, Samsung self-tested the batteries in the Galaxy Note 7.

 

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The Wall Street Journal reports:

To sell smartphones at major U.S. carriers, phone makers are required to test phone batteries at one of the 28 labs certified by the U.S. wireless industry’s trade group, the CTIA, to ensure compliance with standards set by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

Samsung is the only such manufacturer using in-house battery-testing facilities for CTIA certification, according to the association.

This is to pinpoint whether the batteries will function properly while being charged or used for phone calls as during these activities. On top of that, the batteries are put in high temperature situations to simulate summer conditions and to discover potential overheating and combustion hazards. Before this, Microsoft and Lenovo operated their own facilities for CTIA certification, but both facilities have been closed down.

The information has been confirmed by a Samsung spokesperson as well, who also said that internal testing labs did not show any issues in the original and replacement Galaxy Note 7 phones, which is a bit unusual considering the fact that the handset maker announced back in September that there’s a problem inside the Note 7’s battery.

The company is currently investigating the cause of the Galaxy Note 7 fires, and it is yet to share an official explanation.

Source : Wall Street Journal

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