Sony’s new smartphone camera sensor can record 1080p at 1000fps!

Sony has been a big name when it comes to cameras and related products however the company hasn’t been clearly living up to its potential when it comes to smartphone cameras. That could possibly change in the near future however. Sony has now developed a new CMOS camera sensor for smartphones that could revolutionize smartphone photography (or videography if that was a thing).

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With the stacked high-speed, low power consumption, high-capacity DRAM, the new sensor can read one still image of 19.3 million pixels in only 1/120 second (approximately 4x faster than conventional products), reducing the time lapse for reading each pixel line. This technology minimizes the focal plane distortion in still images that tends to occur when shooting fast-moving subjects on smartphones, which lack a mechanical shutter for controlling exposure time.

The new sensor is the industry’s first  3-Layer stacked CMOS image sensor with DRAM which can shoot 1080p slow-motion video at a blistering 1,000 frames per second. To put it in normal english, Sony added RAM to the image sensor to enable high speed capture, eight times faster than the current competition. High end smartphone cameras such as the iPhone 7, Google Pixel or any other that you think is the best, cap out at 120fps at 1080p or 240fps at 720p so obviously, 1000fps at 1080p is a big deal.

The camera captures two streams one of which is at 1000fps and the other at a regular speed both of which are then stored onto the on-chip RAM (independent of your device RAM) for later processing. The connection between the camera and the smartphone’s chipset is slower and takes about 1/30th of a second to store images while the new sensor can do the same job in 1/120th of a second.

This means that the Sony sensor can capture stills of fast moving objects with less focal plane distortion. Here’s a 64x slow-mo demo – from 960fps to 15fps – captured with the new 3-layer image sensor.

The sensor itself has an effective pixel count of 5520 x 3840 (21.2-megapixels), but still images are shot at 19.3-megapixels in 4:3, 17.1-megapixels in 16:9. The Japanese giant hasn’t offered any timelines or info as to when we’ll see this new sensor implemented in an actual smartphone but I hope it is soon.

Source : Sony

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Google Pixel faces another camera issue, a more serious one this time

Don’t call it cameragate just yet, but it appears Pixel users in some countries are experiencing a peculiar issue related to the camera included with Google’s latest smartphone. This isn’t the ‘halo effect‘ that Google has already addressed or the autofocusing issue previously reported, but an issue with the camera app on the Pixel and Pixel XL.

In a post on the Google product forums dated to October 27th, an individual named Mike Fox complains of his Pixel’s camera app locking up, with unsightly purple and pink vertical lines appearing as a byproduct. Continue reading “Google Pixel faces another camera issue, a more serious one this time”

Samsung Galaxy S8 might take better selfies than the competition thanks to.. autofocus

Autofocus is nothing new or revolutionary today, and we take it for granted. In fact, we take it for granted so much that many of you might have never noticed or cared that your phone’s selfie camera doesn’t feature any autofocus. It is a rarity in the smartphone industry to have autofocus on the front camera and for good reasons.

That could change in the near future however. The Samsung Galaxy S8’s front-facing camera may include autofocus (AF) functionality, according to a report from Korean news site etnewsContinue reading “Samsung Galaxy S8 might take better selfies than the competition thanks to.. autofocus”

How to take the best possible smartphone picture of the Super moon

Sky-watchers are in for a celestial treat tonight, when the Moon will be the largest and brightest in 70 years. NASA and National Geographic have posted tips on how to best photograph the supermoon. We won’t see another supermoon like this until 2034, so make sure you get a look.

A “supermoon” occurs when the moon becomes full on the same day as its perigee, the point in the moon’s orbit when it is closest to Earth. The term is borrowed from the pseudoscience of astrology but has been adopted by popular culture and astronomers. Supermoons generally appear to be 14% bigger and 30% brighter than other full moons. While such moons occur around every 13 months, November’s is a special one.

According to NASA, this month’s supermoon “becomes full within about two hours of perigee — arguably making it an extra-super moon.” Continue reading “How to take the best possible smartphone picture of the Super moon”

This is why the Google Pixel & Pixel XL cameras are so good and don’t have OIS

When Google announced its Pixel smartphone last week and boasted about its “best smartphone camera ever,” there was one notable thing it lacked compared to the iPhone: optical image stabilization. Instead of physically stabilizing shots, the Pixel uses readings from the phone’s built-in gyroscope to compensate for shake.

Google has since shed some light on why it decided to go with electronic image stabilization (EIS) instead of optical (OIS). Over in the Pixel User Community forums, a user named Jake Crystal asked for an explanation about the choice. Continue reading “This is why the Google Pixel & Pixel XL cameras are so good and don’t have OIS”

Google Pixel and Pixel XL don’t feature OIS contrary to rumours

Contrary to what appeared listed on Carphone Warehouse’s website, both new Google Pixel phones will not ship with OIS, or Optical Image Stabilization or even expandable storage for that matter.

There is no optical image stabilization but Google has added a new gyroscope-based video stabilization system that reads gyro data 200 times a second for smoother panning and shake-free handheld recording.

Continue reading “Google Pixel and Pixel XL don’t feature OIS contrary to rumours”

Xiaomi’s second teaser for Mi 5s shows a dual camera but the phone might not be Mi 5s after all, pricing leaked

After teasing high benchmark scores in the first teaser yesterday, Xiaomi has released a second teaser for the Mi 5S that confirms dual rear cameras for the smartphone. Earlier rumors said that it will feature a 16-megapixel cameras, so the secondary camera could have a smaller sensor like the Redmi Pro that was unveiled back in July has a 13-megapixel camera along with a 5-megapixel camera for achieving depth of field and real-time background blur.

Continue reading “Xiaomi’s second teaser for Mi 5s shows a dual camera but the phone might not be Mi 5s after all, pricing leaked”

How to take better photos with your Android phone

Many Android phones come with a high-quality camera designed to capture your subject’s tiniest details and features, and while they’re not technically on the same level as a DSLR camera, you can still take the perfect picture with just your phone if you know how to use it. Even if you’re a beginner, you can quickly learn how to capture amazing photos with your Android phone (be sure to check out the new photo editing app called Prisma.)

Here are some helpful tricks to help you take better photos with your Android device.

Explore your camera settings

Get acquainted with your phone and all the camera settings before you start shooting, and you’ll feel a lot more comfortable capturing your shots!

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While shooting from your phone’s stock camera is great for 99.9% of pictures — especially if you’ve got a recent Samsung, LG or HTC phone — playing around with the various modes and settings can really allow you to experiment and get creative.

Make sure your lens is clean

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While this may seem like an obvious one, cleaning your phone lens can be a lot harder to remember than cleaning your DSLR lens. After all, there’s no lens cap protecting your Android phone’s camera from dirt and scratches like professional cameras have.

Carrying around a small lens cleaning cloth, or even having small micro fiber lens cleaning patches stitched to the inside of your purse or your jacket are simple ways to remind you to clean your phone lens and screen, so you’re always ready to take the clearest shots with your phone.

Or just use your shirt.

Forget the flash: use external lighting

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When it’s dark outside, it’s a knee-jerk reaction to turn on the flash to light up your photos, but it’s not always the best for picture quality. In fact, we’ll go one further: Don’t bother using your flash. Nearly ever.

Always try to find a natural light source when you’re shooting your photos. If you’re at a restaurant and want to snap a picture of your meal, try to get a seat by a window, so you can capture all the meal’s details with the perfect lighting. If you’re looking to take a selfie, try posing in front of a big window. This won’t only make your face and features light up – even on a cloudy day – but it will darken the background and make you the center of attention.

If it’s absolutely impossible to capture your picture without natural lighting (and sometimes that’s the case), try your best to find another external light source, like a lamp or even a candle. While it may seem silly, almost any other lighting will look better than the flash, especially since you then have more control of what you choose to light and highlight in your photographs.

Crop, don’t zoom

Just like your Android phone’s flash, zoom is another readily available option for phoneographers that should be avoided like the photographic plague.

Zoom can lower the quality of your pictures, and you might actually be cutting out something you didn’t notice in the photo that you may find amazing when you glance at the picture during editing.

It’s hard to remember when you’re shooting, but your Android device is not the same as a DSLR camera: you can’t just zoom in on something and have the quality stay virtually the same. A lot of professional photographers avoid the zoom altogether and prefer to crop strategically in the editing process afterwards, so they don’t miss out on anything they captured in the picture.

If you really need to get in close with your subject, pick yourself up and physically move closer to it rather than using your zoom. This is the best way to get creative control over your photo subject without using zoom to mess up the picture’s overall quality.

Burst first, ask questions later

Bursting may seem like a lazy way to take pictures, but it’s probably the most efficient way to capture your perfect shot!

Whether it be selfies, landscapes, or a masterpiece of a meal, using burst is a great way to take a bunch of photos without stress: just hold down the shutter button and your phone will take rapid-fire shots that you can browse through later to find the perfect one.

While a bunch of the pictures you take with burst will be terrible and totally unusable, there are bound to be a few gems hiding in there. Take the time to go through your burst shots and pick out the best ones, and always remember to delete the bad burst photos so they don’t take up space on your phone.

Find a favorite photography editing app

After you’re done shooting, you’re going to want to up your photo game by editing your pictures with your favorite editing app.maxresdefault (1).jpg

There are plenty of photo editing apps to choose from out there, and all of them do their own unique things like overlay certain filters, allow you to edit brightness and contrast, and even add text or stickers to your photos.

Photo editing apps are also a great tool to have if you’re not confident with the photos you’ve taken. You can even salvage some photographs through a little bit of editing and tweaking if you’re worried about quality.

Follow your favorite photographers on social media

Sometimes taking the best pictures with your Android phone doesn’t start with your camera app; it starts with a quick visit to social media to get motivated from Android phone photographers who are already taking beautiful pictures!

Following some of your favorite photographers on social media is an amazing way to get ideas, see what kind of art other people are creating, and get motivated to go out and start shooting. Some may even respond in the comments if you ask them how they shot a certain subject in a certain style or how they managed to edit a specific photograph to look a certain way.

Creep around the discover page on Instagram and see what other Android phone photographers have shot. Start by mimicking a style you’re fond of, and it will eventually evolve into your own.

Some photographers on social media even share their own tips and tricks for shooting, so be sure to check out a bunch of different profiles for inspiration.

Your turn

Are there any tips and tricks for shooting amazing photos with your Android phone that we may have missed? Let us know in the comments below.

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